• Feiyi Wen, Untitled from Under the Yuzu Tree (2017), black and white silver gelatin print
  • Feiyi Wen, Untitled from Under the Yuzu Tree (2017), black and white silver gelatin print
  • Feiyi Wen, Untitled from Under the Yuzu Tree (2017), black and white silver gelatin print
  • Feiyi Wen, Untitled from Under the Yuzu Tree (2016), black and white silver gelatin print
  • Feiyi Wen, Untitled from Wood, Water, Rock (2018), archival inkjet print
  • Feiyi Wen, Untitled from Wood, Water, Rock (2018), archival inkjet print
  • Feiyi Wen, Untitled from Wood, Water, Rock (2018), black and white silver gelatin print
  • Artist-in-Residence — Feiyi Wen

    PhD Candidate of UCL Slade School of Fine Art

    Visiting Period: 9 March – 8 May 2019


    Feiyi Wen is a visual artist and researcher, currently undergoing her Practice-led PhD at the Slade School of Fine Art (University College of London) on Eastern Asian aesthetics and photographic practice. She received her Master’s degree in Fine Art Photography from Royal College of Art, London. She works with different media such as photography, moving image, sound and installation.

    She is particularly looking into how we experience the landscape and how narrative alters memory through visual practice. Through using a gentle approach to evoke subtle resonance, the emotions are embodied in the landscapes. Using comparative literature as a method, she examines the different notions of emotion occurring in different times and spaces.

    In East Asian literature, poetic language is usually utilised as a vehicle for the expression of emotion rather than concrete ideas. The resulting imagery is typically taken from nature and landscape, and its figural meaning invokes terms of human emotion that are not only juxtaposed but are truly fused together. This metaphorical visual language that she is trying to engage has led her to think about symbology and the relationship between subjects and their surroundings, as well as the particular kind of narrative sequences she created through images. 

    Under the Yuzu Treeis an on-going project, she is working with mixed media, such as family archive, photographs, paper ephemerals, texts, letters and video installation. She is seeking traces of uncertain identity of her family history. The investigation takes place through the fuzzy memories of family members oral stories. Through investigating family photographs, letter and other material, she is trying to put the fragmental pieces together into some kind of entity. By mixing up different material, she is testing the blurry distinction between documentation and fiction. She is in particular looking into how the narrative is altered from memory through images and how the ambiguous nature contained within the everyday. Within the liminal space between time, space and history, she is interested in the interplay between autobiography and imagination.